Skills Up for Safer World

UNDP Georgia ozone
Practical training in refrigeration service in the professional college "Speqtri". May 2009. Photo: Zviad Nikolaishvili/UNDP

Training in refrigeration service runs in several professional colleges in Georgia. This relatively new profession attracts more and more students who apply their skills and knowledge in different industries.

Highlights

  • Georgia reduced consumption of the most harmful ozone-depleting substances, chlorofluorocarbons or CFCs, to zero in 2008 from 22.5 tonnes a year in 1996.
  • Two centres for recycling harmful refrigerants established with UNDP assistance.
  • 800 refrigeration and air conditioning service professionals and 200 customs officers trained.
  • 20 refrigeration and air conditioning service centres equipped.

Up-to-date refrigeration and air conditioning benefit both economy and environment.  These sectors take a lead in consuming harmful substances that deplete the Stratospheric Ozone Layer. Modern equipment and qualified professionals and are the key to reducing such consumption and controlling damaging emissions.

UNDP has been supporting education in refrigeration service since 2008 under the wider programme aiming to reduce consumption of the ozone-depleting substances. The programme runs in cooperation with the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Protection of Georgia and with funding from the Multi-Lateral Fund on the Montreal Protocol.

UNDP assistance includes the modernization of vocational education in the professional schools   in Tbilisi, Kutaisi and Kobuleti; establishment of two centres for recycling harmful refrigerants; equipment of 20 service centres for refrigeration and air conditioning; training of 800 service professionals and 200 customs officers; and the assistance to the 17 companies and organizations in upgrading equipment and moving to harmless refrigerants.

This joint effort has already brought tangible results. Georgia reduced consumption of the most harmful ozone-depleting substances, chlorofluorocarbons or CFCs, to zero in 2008 from 22.5 tonnes a year in 1996. In a 10-year prospect, the country will phase out the other harmful substances, Hydrochlorofluorocarbons or HCFCs.

May 2009